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5 Poses to Prep Your Body for Meditation

Discussion in 'Yoga' started by arunthathi, Jan 10, 2018.

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  1. arunthathi

    arunthathi Roots of LW Staff Member Administrator New wings

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    A daily meditation practice could be the most important and most impactful thing you can do to enhance your overall health and well-being. This daily ritual connects us to an inner tranquility, counteracting the effects of stress. However, developing a seated posture that you can maintain, especially during longer sits requires attention and often some exploration. In order to hold the body upright in a seated position a yogi needs strength, and resiliency. To avoid rigidity a yogi needs suppleness. Especially if you prefer to sit cross-legged, loosening the hips will be helpful.
    Essentially any pose can assist in preparing the body for meditation, or dhyana. The corpse pose, savasana, is a wonderfully calming pose and may be the perfect pose to prepare you for meditation. For some, however, getting too relaxed may be problematic towards remaining conscious and present. Meditation is the practice of uninterrupted concentration, so it is important that you find the proper balance of alertness with relaxation.
    This sequence is designed to open up key muscles in your chest, hips, and along your spine preparing your body for meditation. A few moderately active standing poses help combat the common sinking of the chest and gradual collapsing of the spine that can cause lower back pain. Poor posture also affects our ability to breath deeply, which is fundamental to many styles of meditation. The balancing poses promotes focus and concentration, preparing our mind for meditation, too. The seated and reclined hip-openers counteract tightness in the legs and hips that often prevent us for sitting for longer periods. Enjoy 5 or more rounds of breath in each pose.
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  2. arunthathi

    arunthathi Roots of LW Staff Member Administrator New wings

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    Start in Tadasana, Mountain Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: Stack your hips over your ankles, this may mean a wider stance for your body. Then stack your shoulder over your hips. Support your head over your spine, relax your shoulders, and allow your arms to hang naturally by your sides. Firm your abdominal muscles to develop strength in your core.
    Balance in Vrksasana, Tree Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: Place your foot firmly against your standing leg making a strong connection, avoid placing the foot against your opposite knee go above or below. Open your knee wide out to the side, this is a hip-opener, too. Keep the spine extended, stand tall and relax your shoulders. Draw your navel center up and in. You may use a wall to support your balance.
    Step your feet apart to practice Parsvottanasana, Pyramid Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: The feet should be off-centered, about hip-width distance apart, and approximately a legs-length distance apart from heel-to-heel – don’t go too short, this will cause your spine to shrink and the focus here is in extending fully from your tailbone to the crown of your head. Bring you hands down on either side of your front foot, using blocks (as shown) is helpful. Keep your hips level, tone your lower abdomen and slightly lift your chest.
    Come down onto your knees for Balasana, Child’s Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: Widen your knees and angle your feet towards the centerline. Keep your arms extended, elongate your spine, and rest your forehead down. A block or blanket underneath your forehead may be useful. This is a great pose to draw your senses inward, the yogic practice of pratyahara.
    Come to a seated position for Janu Sirsasana, Head-to-Knee Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: This is a variation of the classical pose, which keeps the spine long rather than trying to bring your head towards your shin, so a strap may be helpful. Place one foot against your opposite leg and relax your knee downward. Lengthen out through your thighs. Stay upright through your torso, elongate your front body and back body evenly. As you reach towards your foot or ankle avoid rounding your spine.
    Lie onto your back for Sucirandhrasana, Eye-of-the-Needle Pose.
    Key Alignment principles: Keep your feet flexed to protect your knees. Relax your head and shoulders back and down, a blanket underneath the back of your head may be helpful. I prefer to interlace the fingers on the back of my thigh. You could hold onto the top of your shin, just avoid lifting your shoulders away from the floor. Work with your breath to gently expand your comfort zone in the posture.
    You’re right, it’s six poses, but for some child’s pose is not an option, for others you get a bonus pose to prepare you for your meditation. You may also spend a few moments in savasana to promote ease and relaxation throughout your body. I hope you find this helpful, and that you feel well-prepared for meditation.
     
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